Wednesday, August 5, 2009

How to fix a Nikon D70s (or a D70?) Shutter

UPDATE: Lots of people find this article when trying to fix a stuck mirror on a D70. Chris Inch reports that his D70 mirror would stay up after making an exposure normally. Another shutter button press was needed to return the mirror to the down position. He fixed this problem by using a different battery. If this is the problem you're having, give that a try.


Important: I recommend against taking your camera apart. Though I was able to fix the shutter problem, it wasn't by taking the camera apart. (Read on for my fix, which I also don't recommend you do unless you're prepared to risk ruining your camera. I did it as a last resort.) Taking a camera apart will expose you to a risk of electric shock from the capacitor (the thing that looks like a battery) inside. I'm including pictures in case anyone's wondering what the inside of their camera looks like, not because I think you should do this.




A couple of weeks ago I got an email from my friend Tim who asked me "Do you have any use for a dead Nikon D70s?" He had found it in a recycle bin and told me that if nothing else I'd be getting a spare battery. I have a problem saying no, and a misplaced confidence that I can fix anything, so I told him I'd take it. When I got it, it didn't work - as promised. The battery was charged, but when I pressed the shutter button the mirror would go up but the shutter wouldn't open. "Err" blinked on the top LCD, then after pushing the shutter button again the mirror came back down. No photo. A little googling shows this to be a fairly common occurrence with the D70 and D70s, but there aren't a whole lot of suggestions apart from trying a fresh battery, a reset, and sending it off to Nikon and paying $250 for a repair. I tried the first two with no success, but wasn't interested in the third option. It didn't make sense to spend money on a body that came out of dumpster, especially not when a new D40 body is only $400.


Don't do this. I mean it. If you do it, I'm not responsible for what happens.



I figured I didn't have much to lose by taking it apart. I'm fairly handy and I have a set of small screwdrivers that I rarely use. That makes me qualified in my books. :-) Well it was fun, but I didn't learn much apart from what the inside of a D70s looks like. Interesting, but I didn't see anything to suggest what I might do to solve the problem with the shutter. I put it back together and decided to make it a paperweight while I gave it some more thought.

Really don't do this. I'm still not responsible.


A couple of days later it occurred to me that the shutter might just be stuck. I had been thinking that some little actuator was burnt out or some spring had come off its guide, but maybe it was something simpler. If the shutter was stuck, then what it might need was a nudge. So I nudged it: I lifted up the mirror, took a pair of small, pointy sewing scissors and pushed down slightly with a very small force on one of the little rivets in the shutter. (The topmost one in the photo)
The shutter moved a bit.

Encouraged, I removed the scissors, released the mirror and hit the shutter release. The shutter opened and closed. I went and got a memory card and a lens and hit the shutter release again. A photo appeared on the LCD. I had fixed it!

After a week of happy shooting with the D70s it continues to work perfectly. Realistically, I don't expect a lot out of the camera after what it's been through. Getting chucked in a recycle bin followed by disassembly by a fat-fingered, unqualified dumb dumb on his coffee table, then a highly imprecise shutter-shoving with a pair of scissors is probably not a recipe for a reliable camera. But I hope it is, because in a world that has so few user-serviceable parts I feel great about bringing this discarded camera back to life, and keeping at least one piece of electronic gear out of the landfill for just a bit longer. (Oh, and for free. Did I mention that?)


Some notes: I really don't think you should do this. I did it because I had nothing to lose. When I did it, however, I was careful about dust and what length screws came out of which holes. Note that my shutter was stuck in the "UP" position. I suppose it might just as easily have been stuck the other way. The shutter is also EXTREMELY FLIMSY.

Also, who throws a camera in a recycle bin? Maybe one day that'll work, but until then take it to these guys for environmentally friendly recycling. (If you're in Ottawa. If not, your town probably has an option like this too.)

81 comments:

perog said...

Well, I'll be damned! :D Thank you for your guide on how to fix a stuck shutter! :)

I accidentally dropped my D70 in the floor today and luckily nothing broke, but I got the same problem as you got, and exactly as Jason Blackburn had in this post: http://forum.ecoustics.com/bbs/messages/8691/176832.html
Since I don't expect digital slrs last more then a couple of years anyway, I found the courage to do the same as you did - apparently the shock from the fall had mislocated the shutter. A light touch and it popped just back and now it works like a charm again! Hooray! :) Thanks again!
/Per

Tom Bowar said...

I had this happen to my D70 several months ago. I put it away, frustrated that it was apparently going to cost more to fix than another used D70 would cost. Since this was a backup camera, I hadn't done anything about it. Today I was researching the problem again, and ran across your post. I immediately pulled out the camera, popped off the lens, and sure enough, I could see a rivet caught at the top. I too have the expertise of owning small tools, ;) and so I pulled out a small tweezer, unhooked the rivet, and the shutter came loose. It now works again! We'll see if it lasts, but that was amazingly easy.

Ivan Tan said...

I was on the verge of putting this camera forever hidden in my cabinet since it costs too much to repair this shutter problem.

While I was nudging the rivet, I was expecting it to move quite abit but it didn't. However, the camera now works as before after this simple fix.

This is excellent, thanks again! :)

nurlewis said...

I totally cannot believe this! I had the same exact problem with my D70. I had given up on this thing. I was going to try and sell it broken just to recoup whatever I could. I had totally switched over to using 35mm again. With this simple trick, just slightly pulling down on that top rivet and opening up the shutter, it worked. I've only taken a few pictures so far, but it hasn't locked up again. We'll see how long it lasts. Thanks a bunch!

Puduvayal said...

Have the same problem. I held the mirror the filter over the sensor seem to move (I can see the rivets coming down and up). But I cannot see the greek sensore.

Puduvayal said...

I meant the Green sensor. I can see the shutter move but does not expose the sensor.

John Bagnell said...

After you moved the shutter, would the camera then take a picture when you pushed the shutter release? (You can only see the sensor in my photos because I put the camera on Bulb and held the shutter open.)

Greg said...

Thank you for posting this, John! My D70 stopped working out of the blue the other day, and I was at a loss for a fix. Turns out the shutter was stuck as you described. This one post saved me about $1,000!! Thanks again!

Anonymous said...

I have a similar problem, but with some odd differences. My shutter only locks up when I tilt the camera down. When it locks up I also get Err in the LCD window. When I remove the lens to look, the mirror is locked up, and the shutter is _open_ (I can see the sensor).

Pressing the shutter button again closes it (no photo is taken). I turn the camera off, then on, and it photographs fine, _until_ I tilt it down again.

It seems to only happen when the lens is point below the horizon by greater than 45°.

Anonymous said...

Thanks John! I had the exact same problem. Was about to ship it out to a service center. Packed it. Then I found your post. Took it out of the box. Did what you described. Voila! Fixed! Many thanks.

Anonymous said...

I had same problem with Nikon N4004. Jiggling the rivets on the shutter with a very small shraply pointed skewer got it working after several tries.

Daniel said...

Outstanding! I had given up on my D70 thinking it wasn't worth sending it for repair until I nudged the shutter as suggested here. It now works! Thanks.

ian.dalkin said...

sider yourself hugged by a grown man. D70s with a stuck shutter. Nothing a set of podgy fingers and a pointy thing couldn't fix. I was even moved to compose a T-shirt slogan for Nikon.

"D70 owners do it with small tools".

Donal Marron said...

John, you're a champion.

Ever since I bought my D70 when it was first released, it would occasionally freeze up,and then in mid 2009 it stuck totally, requiring a second button press to move the mirror back, but with no picture.
It was lying unused for months, and today I decided to investigate, and do a bit of 'Googling'.

Thanks to you it's now working, and even if it does stick again, no doubt I'll be able to nudge it gently back into life.

Thanks once again for your invaluable insight, and wonderful help.

vertigo said...

Thanks for sharing this with us. Unfortunally my problem is not the same. First the aperture dial stoped working. A few months after, it was the shutter dial that gave up on me. They turn as usual but nothing happens. Anyone had the same problem? Thanks!

Anonymous said...

The same problem met and fixed on a D50 . I've saved money and time . Thank you

Boris said...

Thank You very much!
I have bought second hand D70s,
and it got Err message while I had it less than a week. And as you know, there are no returns in second hand business, so I was very upset...
I though I just threw away $300.
Same night it happened (few days ago) I have started to "google" the problem and stumbled upon your post.
My problem differed a bit from the one you described. My shutter was stuck wide open (I could see the green sensor), and didn't want to close. So, as I didn't have an option to move anything (the curtain) , my treatment was a bit different. I just punched my camera with a fist few times ( I was angry at it anyway :-) ), and the curtain popped up to it's place!
So meanwhile it works, though I still angry at my D70s...
BTW, problem occurred right after I have switched the lens, but it may be a pure coincidence.
Just for the reference, I have called Nikon representative in my country, and they told that it costs ~$400 to fix that problem.
I am glad I didn't have to spend this amount. Actually buying another second hand D70S is cheaper...

Yves said...

Bravo, that really works, was going to send it off, thinking this will never work. Used a tiny soft plastic nib to push the rivet gently so as not to harm the shutter, now works perfectly. Wish I'd known this on the shoot. Thanks.

Anonymous said...

THANKS!! That works!!

Jen said...

I just would like to say THANK YOU a thousand times over. I have a D50 and it's my baby. I noticed it was showing "dust bunnies" last week and was trying to clean it. Well, DH decided to fidget with it, and next thing I knew, it stopped working and gave the ERR message. I priced out one place just to get it cleaned (which I also figured out how to do in the process) and it was going to run me $150. I took tomorrow off of work to go camera shop hopping since I need it for a christening this weekend, and stumbled across your blog. It works beautifully again and I cannot thank you enough for fiddling.

Anonymous said...

Count me as another grateful D70 owner who found this post and saved hundreds of dollars. Thanks very much for this, John.

Anonymous said...

For all of you reading this and are skeptical like I was ... it worked! Gently lift up the mirror and I used a precision tool - the end of a mechanical pencil (not the eraser!). A little pushing on the shutter on all the rivets and it works again! I had given up on my D70 because I replaced it with a D700 but was hoping to keep this one going as a backup. I took it deep sea fishing and after all the bouncing around on the boat, I think it had enough. Now 20 pics later it appears to keep working. Amazing!!

Hugo said...

Thank you very much! Worked like a charm! I was ready to buy a new shutter!

CraftSmith said...

Just saved me $350 in replacing the shutter! thank you so much for this post!!!

Domo said...

THANK YOU SO MUCH! I sold my D70 to a friend of ours who was having a baby. It was in perfect working order while I had it. She got it to take pictures of her newborn, BUT after about 3-4 photo sessions, she had this problem.

I searched and searched, but came up with nothing, until I saw this post. It worked like a charm.

I felt so bad that it broke so soon after she started using it, and today, I was able to shoot the first pics in about 4 months.

Josh and Kalli said...

LIFE SAVER!!

Long story short: my girlfriend dropped her D70 and the mirror would get stuck up and there was that ERR msg, etc. She was freaking out.

I found this article and saw that indeed one of the shutter rivets was stuck or hung up on the top part of the shutter housing (not sure if that's the name but anyway...).

I did just like other people have said and held the mirror up and very lightly nudged the top rivet and it came unstuck!

Camera works. Girl very very happy. Tears of joy.

You can fix things yourself. Be brave. Give it a try!

Josh & Kalli
Atlanta, GA

Anonymous said...

Think the problem started with changing a lense and noticed a focusing problem, then the err. Your suggestion of nudging the shudder worked. Took a pair of sicissors and nudged the rivet, but it did not move. Pushed down on the shudder gently and it dropped into place. Works fine now. Thanks for the solution.

bernard said...

i was about to start opening the many screws on my nikon d50 to find out there's anything i could do to bring it back to life but luckily i nudged the shutter down and it seems to work fine now, i need to resolve why the image is dark on the viewfinder and autofocus does no seem to be working as it should now

Anonymous said...

i had the same problems. Nudging the shutter fixed my issue. thank you

Robert said...

I can't believe it! Our neighbour gave me the camera because Nikon wanted $400 Cdn to fix the shutter, so she bought a new one. She said I could mess around with it and I could keep it if I managed to repair it. I did what you showed and it works perfectly! (I was quite surprised how flimsy the shutter is)
Thank you!

Asia said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Evan said...

IT WORKED YOU SAVED MY BABY.

Used a mechanical pencil tip to nudge it downwards a little. Then took a picture again.

all better now :-)

scott stillman said...

THANK YOU!!!

I tried nudging the shutter a little before I found this post, but after reading it and nudging it a little more strategically by the rivets, it worked!

I'm a happy guy!

Anonymous said...

Great, goy my D70 working again!

Alistair said...

I've had the same problem a couple of times. Rather than pushing the rivet I push the shutter.

I think that the problem is caused by vibration - mine tends to happen when the camera is bounced around a bit. I am quite careful with it it's just it's used underwater in a housing and travelling on a RIB isn't good for anyone.

John Bagnell said...

It seems as if a knock or impact on the camera is sometimes enough to move the shutter away from its resting position enough to get stuck. Maybe as it wears it requires less of an impact, and firing the shutter may even be enough to get it stuck.

Kathleen said...

I dropped my D70 while on vacation and it would not work. The shutter seemed stuck. I took it in to a camera place who told me it is probably the shutter and it would cost a minimum of $250 to fix. I don't have any money. I looked up on the internet (your blog) on how to fix it. I tried it and it was exactly what you said! The shutter moved ever so slightly with the small scizzors and it now works! Thank you for saving me from spending $250 that I do not have!!

ghost said...

To all ye who doubt these methods:

This may not be the ideal way of fixing a stuck shutter (at least in Nikon's eyes-I'm sure their $200+ "nudging" is much more suggested. BUT IT WORKED! I had counted my D70 for dead and am in the process of purchasing a D200 to replace the D70. But it will be good to have a back up camera again.

Please, if you do this, be gingerly with the components. The shutter is oh so fragile and the slightest hiccup, burp, or sneeze could render you in big trouble for good.

Thank you for posting this. You saved me BIG TIME!

thatoneguy said...

Could you email me a picture that you've taken with the camera? I'd like to pull some data to get an idea of how many exposures were taken with the camera before shutter failure. I'm just going to give you my email address for crap mail since this is kind of open forum :) jurickk.spam@gmail.com

I appreciate it, and thanks for the write up.

Anonymous said...

I just fixed the shutter on a friend's D70. Thank you so much for this guide! :-)

Cheers from Germany
ATea

bogdescu said...

I love you.

shawncampbell said...

Add another D70s to the fixed list. Thanks!

Anonymous said...

This is one of the most amazing things I experienced recently. I was considering to trash my D70 because sending it back costs $200+. Right before I was going to switch to Canon I found this solution and it solved my problem in only a few minutes. Thanks!

Anonymous said...

Damn you, I fixed my D70s by following your post and now I cannot justify a New D7000 :-)

Thank you

Anonymous said...

Could any of you provide more detailed instructions on how to poke the shutter rivets? I've been nudging at them for an hour, and my shutter is still just as stuck as before!

Drew said...

OK, I'm a complete newbie when it comes to this so please bear with me. I borrowed a D70 and I need to fix it before I return it. The mirror is sticking up however I don't see any shutter, only the green sensor. Any ideas?

Jasmine said...

You're the bomb! I did this and saved lots of money. I thought my camera was toast and I just spent $400 on repairs last year, so I thought this camera was toast. Thanks so much!

Javier said...

Thank you so much for sharing this. I've followed your suggestions and voilá! D70s is back to life!

The body accidentally fell down and then when wanted to shot I heard just the mirror going up but not going back and the display showing Err!....

Gracias!

Javier

mass confusion said...

dude, your a lifesaver. my camera went down for the count on a shoot on new years eve. just after the clock struck 12. i had couple coming up to me for photos and my camera was no longer on the job. it has been going out on me for the past couple of years on and off. i have been putting on the shelf and periodically trying to see if miraculously it would start working again like it has in the past. completely frustrated at the thought of not being able to take pictures since i have no back up and can't financially replace it now. i took it into my own hands to try again. i ran into your post and fixed it with my fingers in second flat. c'mon really? your the best ever. thanks

mass confusion said...

your awesome thanks alot.

Anonymous said...

Another D70 with a new lease of life :-)

Successfully carried out this fix a year or so ago - had the same attitude as the author "well this camera's a gonner so nothing to lose" before poking the shutter with a pair of nail scissors. Was delighted that it worked, thought it probably won't last long - but the camera worked perfectly (it gets used a lot) until today, and the shutter stuck again. I thought well it's had a year's more use than I was expecting, mustn't complain, but before I bin it I'll see if Mr Bagnell's fix will work a 2nd time. So I gave the shutter the scissor treatment and off it went again. Amazing. So far so good - if it means I can get a few more months out of this camera I'll be extremely happy.

A thousand thankyous John Bagnell.
Allan (London, UK)

Anonymous said...

Can I add my D50 in the hall of fame? I am a techie and was getting ready to take it to pieces and dreading the process, but this worked a treat, without removing the single screw from the body!

here is the improved procedure;

Set your camera to manual, then bulb mode, that way the mirror will be out of the way all the time, then do your trick with a small jewelers screwdriver and keep pressing the shoot button until the shutter is free again!

Very many thanks!

Liam said...

I have a similar problem with my D70. Instead of having the mirror stuck down, it is stuck up. I tried your technique of moving the rivets downward, but to no avail. Should I be moving them upward?

Anonymous said...

Awesome article i just bought 2 old Nikons in Ebay a D50 with this very problem and a D100 (i think the shutter has had it) But Hallelujah your remedy worked on the D50 and its fully functional ant taking wonderful pics Many Many Many thanks.. considering i only paid $55 each for the 2 Cameras its a Bargain and the repair was free.... :)

FH Scorpioin said...

UNBELIEVABLE! I've had my D50 on a shelf for over a year after my son dropped it. I took a jewel screwdriver to the 'little rivet' and behold, IT LIVES! Charging the battery now, but took several pictures as normal. Thanks!

Laurent said...

Like all the others, you saved my D70s. Since my kid is 3 months old, I was already looking for another camera because I didn't want to lose any moment of his first months among us. Sure, the phone camera and the compact camera could do the job, but it would have been rather frustrating, considering the lens kit I have.

Unfortunately, because of the flooding in Thailand it's pretty hard to buy a replacement Nikon body these days. Here in France, we have to wait something like two months.

So I thank you a lot again, I can now wait for some time before planning to get a new camera, the d7000 looks like a good candidate.

Laurent

Nathaniel said...

I'm having the same problem with my secondhand Nikon D70s.. my father was disappointed with me because i'm the one who bought the camera.
I tried this method but it fucked up the shutter but i opened the back of the camera like your first method to fix the shutter..
I'm planning to have a second attempt, do i need to pull down the rivet of the shutter until it expose the sensor? or i just need to just poke it?

Sham Can said...

Thank you so much. I accidentally dropped my D70s and the shutter stopped working. I didn't have anything to lose and I just poked the point you showed. It worked.
Good poking everyone, nice job Nikon, you made a camera that works with pokes.

Anonymous said...

(CAREN from Malaysia)

I have the same problem. Thinking to send my 7yrs old D70s to repair. Came across your post and decided to give a try. Great! My D70s works again! MILLION THANKS for sharing this experience with us. (^_@)

Ventossuli said...

I am writing to tell you that I also had success in the repair operation. Here in Brazil the repair of this camera is not made by Nikon in Sao Paulo, and besides being very expensive, take too long to do so. Thank you for sharing your experience!

Ventossuli said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Still Frustrated said...

I have the exact same symptoms on my Nikon D70S. 'Err' in the window, shutter appears stuck. I've pushed on it and pushed on it for hours over several different attempts. I walk away and come back to it the next day to try again thinking I'll get the right touch, but nothing seems to be working. One question I have is, does the power need to be on or off while I'm pushing on the rivets (I've tried both ways)? Also, it appears the first step, i.e., removing the screws, taking off the back, etc., is not necessary, correct?

When I removed the lens, and move the mirror up, my shutter looks exactly like the one in the post with the red arrow showing the direction to push on the rivet. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks.

ken2400 said...

I just turned the camera upside down while looking at the stutter and it started working again. Accounting to http://www.camerashuttercount.com/ I have around 31000. It's a bad sign. I Will go with my gut and sent it back to the ebay seller. Thanks for orig posting and all who have posted comments.

John Bagnell said...

@Stillfrustrated: I had the power off when I nudged my shutter, I think it's safer that way. No, dismantling the camera is not necessary. There may be many causes for the problem you have, and this fix might not help. I hope it does though. Thanks!

gb said...

The Camera store guy offered my $25 for the body and both lenses. I found your page and brought it back to life.
Thank you for the photos and easy fix.
I was about to sell it cheap on eBay as a broken Camera.
I merely flicked mine with my finger!
Works like a Charm!!

Damon said...

Awesome. Not sure why this works, but it does! Thanks for the help.

maarten bretveld said...

John Thank you for this.
I managed to fix the d70 my old man had laying around.
as a reward he gave it to me.
:D

Anonymous said...

You've just inadvertently fixed my sister's D40. We were about to order a new one. THANKS man.

Anonymous said...

You're my hero ! I dropped my d70 and had exactly the same pb. Now it's fixed !

Martin Edwards (UK) said...

My D70 gave up about 4 years ago. Wasn’t economic to get it repaired so kept it in its shiny box as I didn’t have the heart to throw it …yes I always keep the box – sad, I know. Eventually bought myself a D7000 (really nice box) and used the excellent 18-70 lens that came with the D70. It’s my birthday so just treated myself to some nice new lenses and was wondering what to do with the redundant but still excellent 18-70. Wishfully started thinking that as the old D70 had been left in the dark for 4 years (AKA sleeping beauty) it might perhaps change its mind and magically start working again and so keep my young son’s sticky fingers off my D7000 . Got it out of its box, gave it an ugly frog kiss and surprise, surprise …it didn’t work. Started looking on the interweb for ideas, lots of interesting theories…all useless. Looked like I’d have to get a cheap body off ebay just to keep the old lens in use for the lad.

But no! Wait a minute! Some bloke called John Bagnall says give it a quick poke with a pair of scissors. Bloody hell! It works!!

John Bagnell for Prime Minister, President and Pope, I say! Old conked out D70 owners should not be so selfish to be the only ones to benefit from this man’s brilliant approach to fixing seemingly complex problems with some simple, inquisitive, yet spellbinding commonsense. World recession, war in the middle-east, rip off camera repair centres, your time has come John, we’re with you all the way. The G8 summit awaits!

pideja said...

I accidentally dropped my D70 in the floor today and luckily nothing broke. But the shutter did not open when I pressed the shutter release, I got error r03 and upon second release, the mirror dropped down.
Armed with an exacto blade, I very carefully attempted to do the same as you did - apparently the shock from the fall had mislocated the shutter. A light touch and it popped just back and now it works like a charm again! Hooray! :) Merci beaucoup! Pierre

jodi stone said...

HOLY COW YES!! it worked !! my life is awesome again!! thanks a million!

ellensookie said...

Holy Cow!!!! I searched around for a solution to my stuck shutter and then I found your column aand did what you said and .......YES it worked!! Thanks,

Hans said...

Great man! it works. Thank you very much. I hope this is a lasting solution but for now it works fine.
thanks again
\Hans

Thinkfor1sec said...

I have my GCSE exam for photography in a month!!! I have this problem, but I have 'CLOCK' written under "err", any suggestions? ive tried this post but I don't really know which way to nudge it :L

BobH said...

Thanks, John. I had benched my D70s, as I couldn't bring myself to bury it just yet. Your fix worked perfectly. I used the the clean end of a Tootsie-Roll lollipop, and pushed gently on the top rivet. Nothing happened. So, very disappointed, I re-attached the lens, and released the shutter once again, and VIOLA! It worked, AND I have a photo on the flash card! Now I'm one very happy dude!

Cheers!
Bob H
Southern Maryland

Anonymous said...

Thanks John. You have just allowed me to fix my D70s. Which is great, and means i do not have that newer body.. Let me know if you are ever in Brighton, and I will buy you a beer. Cheers Jerome

leo in saint louis said...

My D70 has its shutter stuck open. Anyone have a suggestion how to deal with that?

Anonymous said...

Gretch in San Fran:
My D70 took a tumble, and when I brought it out to take photos experienced the dreaded stuck shutter. I was saddened thinking I was going to be going a long time before ponying up for a new camera body. Then I found this site and went hmmmmmm.....

Took a photo, let the mirror flip up and jam, then shut off the camera and popped off the lens. Son of a gun. I could see FOUR rivets, a second one that normally lurks just under the metal frame of the shutter, that had clearly gotten stuck on the edge of the metal frame. The shutter material is super, super flexible so my theory is that the shutter 'flapped' during impact, then the rivet caught on the frame.

Anyways, two careful pushes on the rivet and whishk, it vanished back under the metal frame, and I'm again able to take pictures! As long as I don't bang it again I'm thinking it will probably be just fine. Can't thank you enough!

Anonymous said...

Well, this might be a good thing for me too, and my issue is with a D700. In my short life handling Nikons, I have dropped 2 D700s, both right square on the bottom. Both immediately began to have mirrors hang. I am guessing now that the parts have to interlock and work together in normal ops, so the shutter could be causing the mirror to hang. Either way, we are going to see tonight if I can fix a D700 using your "poke it and see if it works" routine. I can tell you for certain that the "hold down the shutter button on Continuous high while simultaneously whacking the bottom of the camera with a claw hammer DID NOT WORK. This is where I am apprehensive. I can fire off dozens of SHOTS, but the mirror is 'out of sequence' or something. IT FLIPS DOWN but right back up and out of sight. In the VF I get either black, or a flash of color that you normally think of as 'shutter black out', except instead of black in the eyepiece you are getting a fraction of a second of PHOTO. RIGHT NOW it seems like it believes it's rest position is UP. So I am not too hopeful about this, but it WILL be tried tonight. If I screw it up, it has to go to the shop anywhay.

Flick said...

Oh my god.... You saved my Nikon D70 that had shutter-mirror stuck for 3 years. I was without a camera for 3 years and now I came to this post. I fixed it just like you described, without removing a single screw. As the mirror was stuck I just lightly moved the shutter leaves. As they went down my sensor appeared after 3 years. I mounted a lens and it works fine now. I am eternally thankful to you for this post.